The Attack on Black History, with Nikole Hannah-Jones and Jelani Cobb

Listen and subscribe: Apple | Spotify | Google | Wherever You ListenSign up to receive our weekly newsletter of the best New Yorker podcasts.Across much of the country, Republican officials are reaching into K-12 classrooms and universities alike to exert control over what can be taught. In Florida, Texas, and many other states, laws now

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Across much of the country, Republican officials are reaching into K-12 classrooms and universities alike to exert control over what can be taught. In Florida, Texas, and many other states, laws now restrict the teaching of historical facts about race and racism. Book challenges and bans are surging. Public universities are experiencing political meddling in the tenure process. Nikole Hannah-Jones, the New York Times Magazine reporter who developed the 1619 Project, and Jelani Cobb, the dean of the Columbia University School of Journalism, talk with David Remnick. “I just think it’s rich,” Hannah-Jones says, “that the people who say they are opposing indoctrination are, in fact, saying that curricula must be patriotic.” Also, the New Yorker film critic Justin Chang tells us what he can’t wait to watch.

The Attack on Black History, with Nikole Hannah-Jones and Jelani Cobb

Why are so many states restricting what schools can teach about racism? Two leading journalist-historians discuss the efforts to ban or rewrite the teaching of Black history.


The Film Critic Justin Chang on What to See in 2src24

The New Yorker’s new critic on three films he’s excited about this year.


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