Cast Member Sarah Sherman Responds to ‘Ugly’ SNL Controversy

Saturday Night Live star Sarah Sherman told former cast members Dana Carvey and David Spade on Friday that she wishes she never responded to the viral TikTok that claimed the show has “never hired a hot woman.”After seeing the TikTok from user Jahelis reshared to Twitter, Sherman retweeted it and said “just found out i’m

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Saturday Night Live star Sarah Sherman told former cast members Dana Carvey and David Spade on Friday that she wishes she never responded to the viral TikTok that claimed the show has “never hired a hot woman.”

After seeing the TikTok from user Jahelis reshared to Twitter, Sherman retweeted it and said “just found out i’m not hot. please give me and my family space to grieve privately and uglily at this time.” Her quip went viral along with the video itself, but Sherman told Spade and Carvey that she wishes she hadn’t brought any additional attention to the comments.

“I shouldn’t have fucking said fucking anything because she said some shit for attention,” Sherman said on the pair’s spin-off Superfly podcast. “I was mad at myself for the tweet,” she added, but was set off by the individuals called out in the video.

“She brings up women who are like, literally drop dead baba gaga gorgeous,” Sherman said. The TikToker singled out cast member Heidi Gardner as an example of the lack of female hotness on the show, saying “No offense to her, but she’s not that pretty.” Later in the video, she presents a conjoined photo of Maya Rudolph, Amy Poehler, Tina Fey and Aidy Bryant, and others, calling them all “pretty average looking women.”

“What is she smoking?” Sherman continued, calling the women referenced “some of the most beautiful.”

She went on to explain what else went into her comment, saying that friends always send her mean stuff people say about her online. “I woke up in the morning and everyone texted me,” about that TikTok she said,.“None of my friends care if I live or die but then I woke up to like a hundred texts from my friends being like, ‘ha ha ha, look at this LOL.’”

“When people text me that, they’re like, ‘Did you see this? Aha,’ it’s not really ‘LOL’ it’s more like, ‘I want you to see this,’” she continued. “My friends don’t send me anything good, or like anything positive,” she said, describing her mindset when she first saw the TikTok. “I was sitting on the train just being like, I don’t know. I just fucking tweeted it and I immediately regretted tweeting it,” she said. “That’s what people want. They just want attention for one second.”

“I didn’t want it to come across as defensive,” she went on to say, “People thought like I was legitimately upset and I’m like, no, I woke up ready to say something hilarious about grieving—uglily.”

“But ultimately I wish I didn’t say anything because then it just made it a bigger deal,” Sherman concluded.

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